What Microsoft will do with the Nokia Devices and Services now taken over, but currently producing a yearly loss rate of as much as $1.5 billion?

In the information made officially available for this transition (see below) there are no answers for that question. It only becomes clear that the new Microsoft Devices Group under formation needs to be put into much more efficient organisation, with significantly better strategic setup than any of its constituent parts were before. This would be not an easy task as this group will “oversee an expanded devices business that includes Lumia smartphones and tablets, Nokia mobile phones, Xbox hardware, Surface, Perceptive Pixel (PPI) products, and accessories”.

The stock market, so far, was positive about this:

image
Source: Google Financse – Yahoo Finance – MSN Money

The real explanations for that optimism are not related to the acquisition itself at all. Instead to the more and more visible signs of  “Microsoft 2.0” which will end the “Microsoft 1.0” era of “loss of business focus” and “morphing into a different company, whose focus may be different from selling low margin mid and low end mobile phones, mostly in very competitive markets”. The speculation is that the upcoming “Microsoft 2.0 is about MICROSOFT on every device”  instead of “Microsoft 1.0 which was about Windows on every computer”. There is even an overall consensus that the nominally $7.2 billion Nokia acquisition will be soon quite easily written off (as well as other unpaid previous strategic investments), as in fact that costed to Microsoft only $4.5 billion in reality.

Note here as well that my findings last week are quite well proving the above line of thoughts: Microsoft is transitioning to a world with more usage and more software driven value add (rather than the old device driven world) in mobility and the cloud, the latter also helping to grow the server business well above its peers [‘Experiencing the Cloud’, April 25, 2014].

So before the Nokia Devices and Services transition information released officially, read the below stock market expert opinion:

Microsoft Completes Nokia’s Acquisition: Expect A Significant Write-Off, Mitigated By A Tax Advantage [Paolo Gorgo on Seeking Alpha, April 28, 2014]

While we believe that Microsoft will have a hard time digesting and turning around an unprofitable division like Nokia’s handset business, having to deal with three different operating systems (Microsoft’s own WinPhone, Asha and now even a forked version of Android that powers Nokia’s new X range), and operating in a very competitive sector where only Samsung (OTC:SSNLF) and Apple (AAPL) can now turn a profit, we are fully aware that only time will tell investors if a happy ending out of Nokia’s acquisition is possible.

Some recent moves, however, following Microsoft’s CEO transition may indicate that the climate that lead to the Nokia’s acquisition has already changed, and allow for some educated guesses about what we estimate as the most probable outcome.

Microsoft 1.0 morphing into Microsoft 2.0

John Kirk recently wrote one of the most interesting analysis of Microsoft’s business model, and how it may be evolving:


Microsoft 1.0 had one of the most successful business models of all time. But no matter how successful Microsoft became, management seemingly could not abide the thought of any other technology company sharing the spotlight of success.

  1. If a competitor was being successful with customers Microsoft wasn’t addressing, Microsoft had to have those customers as well.
  2. If a competitor was being successful in a market where Microsoft didn’t compete, Microsoft felt compelled to compete there as well.
  3. Most damning of all, if a competitor’s success could be attributed to its business model, Microsoft felt compelled to assimilate that business model and make it their own.

Microsoft wasn’t setting their own agenda. Instead, they were letting the successes of their competitor’s set the agenda.

The analysis goes on describing how Microsoft behaved in relations to Apple’s iPod success, and how it failed trying to win that market (do you remember Zune?).

In the mobile market, Microsoft tried once more to copy Apple’s strategy, becoming an integrated hardware/software producer through the Nokia acquisition.

A failed attempt, already: no one, for example, would expect Apple to license its iOS free of charge to other OEMs in an attempt to create a sustainable ecosystem.

Time to try analyze Microsoft’s new CEO, Satya Nadella, first moves, and what they may mean related to the Nokia acquisition.

Nadella cuts Windows umbilical cord

The launch of Word, Excel and Powerpoint in the Apple App Store, ahead of the Windows platform, was a clear indication that Nadella may be pursuing a different strategy from Ballmer:

The move was anticipated, pragmatic (given the contrasting installed bases of the two tablets, especially in enterprises), and only relates to one product on one device. But it was just about as symbolic as a gesture could be, reinforcing the promises which Nadella made on his accession to the throne – to put mobile and cloud strategies at the heart of Microsoft’s growth plan.

The Office for iPad announcement makes all this explicit, though it also raises new questions – particularly, whether Nadella is less sold than Ballmer on the idea of creating an integrated hardware/software platform, Apple-style, for mobile, post-PC and cloud-attached devices.

Back to John Kirk’s analysis, we’d like to highlight one of his forecasts for Microsoft 2.0 we completely agree with:

Unprofitable strategies (like Windows RT, the Surface tablet, Windows Phone 8, buying Nokia, moving to a functional organization) will be undone. This will take some doing but the process has already begun.

In other words (with our note added in brackets and Italic):

Microsoft 1.0 was about Windows on every computer. Microsoft 2.0 is about MICROSOFT on every computer. [we would probably use the word “device” instead of computer to underline a post-PC era]

Another write off, soon? A definitive “probably”, although Microsoft investors shouldn’t be too worried

A quick look at some recent Microsoft write offs, mostly due to acquisitions / entries into unknown territories that were not completely successful (some numbers are missing for attempts like Zune, etc. that did not technically require a write-off):

image

We do believe that Nokia might soon become Microsoft’s next big write off, as the Redmond company morphs into a different company, whose focus may be different from selling low margin mid and low end mobile phones, mostly in very competitive markets .

The way the deal was structured, however, will probably mitigate the negative impact for Microsoft investors.

Kudos to Robert Cringely for his bright use of lateral thinking at the time the Nokia acquisition was announced:

I don’t think Nokia has to succeed in order for Microsoft to consider the acquisition a success.

So why, then, did Microsoft buy Nokia? The stated reason is to better compete with Android and iOS, furthering Ballmer’s new devices and services strategy, but I think that game is already lost and this has more to do with finance than phones.

Microsoft, like Apple and a lot of other companies, has a problem with profits trapped overseas where they avoid for awhile U.S. taxation. The big companies have been pushing for a tax holiday or at least a deal of some sort with the IRS but it isn’t happening. So Apple, sitting on $140+ billion has to borrow $17 billion to buy back shares and pay dividends because so much of its cash is tied-up overseas. But not Microsoft, which just bought Nokia – a foreign company – with some of its overseas cash. Redmond said so today. That makes the real price of Nokia not $7 billion but more like $4.5 billion, because it’s all pre-tax money.

So what does that make Microsoft’s acquisition of Nokia?

Money laundering.

Calling the Nokia acquisition money laundering may probably be a stretch, but as many analysts noticed when the deal was announced, the real “cost” to Microsoft is less that the number reported, because of the use of overseas funds.

Add to this that a write-off can be positively seen as a creative “NOL generating” financial operation for a very profitable company, and you get to our point: as Microsoft’s new strategies, which may include de-emphasizing the device and services reorganization, become clearer, Nokia may represent the last bad news generated by “Microsoft 1.0” loss of business focus, and a not-too-expensive price to pay for Microsoft investors while moving to a better focused Microsoft 2.0.



Nokia Devices and Services transition information released officially

Microsoft officially welcomes the Nokia Devices and Services business [press release, April 25, 2014]

Microsoft and the Nokia Devices and Services business are coming together as one to deliver a family of devices and services that will delight consumers and empower businesses.

image
Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella (left) and executive vice president of Microsoft Devices Group Stephen Elop share a moment as the deal that brings together Microsoft and the Nokia Devices and Services business closes today.

Microsoft Corp. announced it has completed its acquisition of the Nokia Devices and Services business. The acquisition has been approved by Nokia shareholders and by governmental regulatory agencies around the world. The completion of the acquisition marks the first step in bringing these two organizations together as one team.

“Today we welcome the Nokia Devices and Services business to our family. The mobile capabilities and assets they bring will advance our transformation,” said Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella. “Together with our partners, we remain focused on delivering innovation more rapidly in our mobile-first, cloud-first world.”

Reporting to Nadella is former Nokia President and CEO Stephen Elop, who will serve as executive vice president of the Microsoft Devices Group, overseeing an expanded devices business that includes Lumia smartphones and tablets, Nokia mobile phones, Xbox hardware, Surface, Perceptive Pixel (PPI) products, and accessories. Microsoft welcomes personnel with deep industry experience in more than 130 sites across 50 countries worldwide, including several factories that design, develop, manufacture, market and sell a broad portfolio of innovative smart devices, mobile phones and services. As part of the transaction, Microsoft will honor all existing Nokia customer warranties for existing devices, beginning April 25, 2014.

Windows Phone is the fastest-growing ecosystem in the smartphone market, and its portfolio of award-winning devices continues to expand. In the fourth quarter of 2013, according to IDC, Windows Phone reinforced its position as a top three smartphone operating system and was the fastest-growing platform among the leading operating systems with 91 percent year-over-year gain.[1] Furthermore, with the Nokia mobile phone business, Microsoft will target the affordable mobile devices market, a $50 billion annual opportunity,[2] delivering the first mobile experience to the next billion people while introducing Microsoft services to new customers around the world.

Microsoft will continue to deliver new value and opportunity, and it will work closely with a range of hardware partners, developers, operators, distributors and retailers, providing platforms, tools, applications and services that enable them to make exceptional devices. With a deeper understanding of hardware and software working as one, the company will strengthen and grow demand for Windows devices overall.

As with any multinational agreement of this size, scale and complexity, Microsoft and Nokia have made adjustments to the deal throughout the close preparation process. As announced previously, Microsoft will not acquire the factory in Masan, South Korea, and the factory in Chennai, India, will stay with Nokia due to the tax liens on Nokia’s assets in India that prevent transfer. As a result, Microsoft will welcome approximately 25,000 transferring employees from around the world.

More information about Microsoft’s expanded family of devices and services is available here.

Founded in 1975, Microsoft (Nasdaq “MSFT”) is the worldwide leader in software, services and solutions that help people and businesses realize their full potential.

Microsoft refers to Microsoft Corp. and its affiliates, including Microsoft Mobile Oy*, a subsidiary of Microsoft. Microsoft Mobile Oy develops, manufactures and distributes Lumia, Asha and Nokia X mobile phones and other devices.

1 IDC Worldwide Quarterly Mobile Phone Tracker, February 2014

2 Strategy Analytics Inc.

* Oy being a Finnish abbreviation of Osakeyhtiö which translates to Limited company ala Wikipedia

From Nokia Corporation Interim Report for Q1 2014 [April 29, 2014]

DISCONTINUED OPERATIONS

The following table sets forth a summary of the results for discontinued operations, for the periods indicated, as well as the year-on-year and sequential growth rates.
image

Note: The –16.9% operating margin for the discontinued operations in Q1/2014 means a loss of $452 million (EUR 326 million). That is huge, considering even that in the previous Q4/2013 quarter the loss was “only” $274 million (EUR 197.6 million), as with that the ongoing annual loss rate could be estimated close to $1.5 billion.

Net Sales

The year-on-year and sequential declines in discontinued operations net sales in the first quarter 2014 were primarily due to lower Mobile Phones net sales and, to a lesser extent, lower Smart Devices net sales

On both a year-on-year and sequential basis, our Mobile Phones net sales were affected by competitive industry dynamics, including intense smartphone competition at increasingly lower price points and intense competition at the low end of our product portfolio. Our Smart Devices net sales were affected by competitive industry dynamics including the strong momentum of competing smartphone platforms.

On both a year-on-year and sequential basis, discontinued operations unit volumes declined in the first quarter 2014. The year-on-year decline in discontinued operations unit volumes was due to lower Mobile Phones unit volumes, partially offset by higher Smart Devices unit volumes. Sequentially, the decline in discontinued operations unit volumes was primarily due to lower Mobile Phones unit volumes and, to a lesser extent, lower Smart Devices unit volumes.

Discontinued operations Average Selling Price (ASP) declined on both a year-on-year and sequential basis in the first quarter 2014. The year-on-year and sequential declines in discontinued operations ASP were due to lower ASPs for both Smart Devices and Mobile Phones.

Discontinued operations ended the first quarter 2014 within our normal 4 to 6 week channel inventory range
Non-IFRS Gross Margin
The year-on-year decline in discontinued operations non-IFRS gross margin in the first quarter 2014 was primarily due to lower Smart Devices gross margin and, to a lesser extent, lower Mobile Phones gross margin. Compared to the first quarter 2013, Smart Devices non-IFRS gross margin was negatively impacted by the absence of the reversal of approximately EUR 50 million of previously recognized inventory related allowances for our Windows Phone 7-based Lumia products which benefitted Smart Devices non-IFRS gross margin in the first quarter 2013 as well as approximately EUR 20 million of allowances related to excess components in the first quarter 2014. Compared to the first quarter 2013, Mobile Phones non-IFRS gross margin in the first quarter 2014 benefitted from lower warranty costs, mainly offset by the negative affect of approximately EUR 40 million of allowances related to excess components.
On a sequential basis, the decline in discontinued operations non-IFRS gross margin in the first quarter 2014 was primarily due to lower Mobile Phones gross margin and, to a lesser extent, lower Smart Devices gross margin. On a sequential basis, Smart Devices non-IFRS gross margin in the first quarter 2014 benefitted from the absence of approximately EUR 50 million of net allowances related to excess component inventory, future purchase commitments and an inventory revaluation that negatively impacted Smart Devices non-IFRS gross margin in the fourth quarter 2013, partially offset by approximately EUR 20 million of allowances related to excess components in the first quarter 2014. Compared to the previous quarter, Mobile Phones non-IFRS gross margin in the first quarter 2014 benefitted from lower warranty costs, mainly offset by the negative affect of approximately EUR 40 million of allowances related to excess components.
Non-IFRS Operating Expenses
On both a year-on-year and sequential basis, the decline in discontinued operations non-IFRS operating expenses in the first quarter 2014 was due to lower operating expenses in both Mobile Phones and Smart Devices.
Non-IFRS Operating Profit
The year-on-year decline in discontinued operations non-IFRS operating profit in the first quarter 2014 was primarily due to lower Smart Devices and Mobile Phones non-IFRS operating profit. On a sequential basis, the decline in discontinued operations non-IFRS operating profit in the first quarter 2014 was due to lower Mobile Phones non-IFRS operating profit, partially offset by higher Smart Devices non-IFRS operating profit.
Discontinued operations non-IFRS other income and expenses was an expense of EUR 22 million in the first quarter 2014, compared to an expense of EUR 18 million in the first quarter 2013 and an expense of EUR 9 million in the fourth quarter 2013.
Operating Profit
The year-on-year decline in discontinued operations operating profit in the first quarter 2014 was primarily due to lower Smart Devices and Mobile Phones operating profit. On a sequential basis, the decline in discontinued operations operating profit in the first quarter 2014 was due to lower Mobile Phones operating profit, partially offset by higher Smart Devices operating profit.
Discontinued operations other income and expenses was an expense of EUR 32 million in the first quarter 2014, compared to an expense of EUR 65 million in the first quarter 2013 and an expense of EUR 15 million in the fourth quarter 2013. On a year-on-year basis discontinued operations other income and expenses was a lower expense primarily due to lower restructuring charges.

From #1: Conversations LIVE: Ask me anything with Stephen Elop [Conversations : now part of Microsoft, April 28, 2014]

Earlier today we hosted a live Q&A session with Stephen Elop on his first day as the Executive Vice President of the Microsoft Devices Group.

Re: You’re so cool killed Nokia …Thanks to you, Meego, Symbian, Meltemi buried …Once you get it all comes back to haunt

I know that there is a lot of emotion around some of the hard decisions that we had to make. Back in late 2010 and 2011, we carefully assessed the state of the internal Nokia operating system efforts. Unfortunately, we could not see a way that Symbian could be brought to a competitive level with, for example, the iPhone that had shipped THREE years earlier! And the Meego effort was significantly delayed and did not have the promise of a broad enough portfolio soon enough. We had to make a forceful decision to give Nokia the chance to compete again.

Re: You have [been] bashed very harshly with your efforts to take Nokia to Microsoft, have been awarded as Trojan in online discussions and comments. Do you take any effect of all this on your work/decision?

As a result of the work that we have done, we have transformed Nokia into a stronger company with NSN, HERE and Advanced Technologies. At the same time, our Devices and Services business has a new opportunity within a stronger Microsoft. As for the Trojan horse thing, i have only ever worked on behalf of and for the benefit of Nokia shareholders while at Nokia. Additionally, all fundamental business and strategy decisions were made with the support and approval of the Nokia board of directors, of which I was a member.

Re: Don’t you think the decision of jumping the burning platform was significantly delayed by Nokia? Do you think MSFT will be in the state of competing Android any time soon?

It’s hard to comment on what came before, but I do know that the “burning platform” galvanized the mindset of thousands of employees with the recognition that we faced a critical situation. We brought urgency into the organization and within 6 months we produced our first two Windows Phone devices. This was faster than we had ever gone before and marked the beginning of our cultural change.

Now, we’re one Microsoft: open letter from Stephen Elop [Conversations : now part of Microsoft, April 25, 2014]

Today we are announcing that the acquisition of substantially all of the Nokia Devices and Services business by Microsoft has reached completion, following approval by Nokia shareholders and regulatory authorities.

Six months ago, we announced our plans to bring the best of Microsoft and Nokia Devices and Services business together. Today is an exciting day as we join the Microsoft family, and take the first, yet important, step in our long-term journey.

At our core, we are passionate about building technology that will change the world. From the early vision of Microsoft of placing a PC in every home and on every desk, to Nokia connecting billions of people through mobile devices, we have empowered generations. But we could not have achieved any of this without our fans around the world.

Your support has created strong momentum for Nokia Lumia smartphones and they continue to grow in popularity around the world. Last year alone, the awards, accolades and fan-generated rave reviews offered proof of the growing number of champions for our phones and tablets.

And we are committed to continuing our support for feature phones, the Asha family, and the Nokia X family of devices, announced at the Mobile World Congress in February.

Whether you want to read more, capture more, watch more, listen more or get more done, Nokia mobile devices have been and are your go-to choice.

As Microsoft and Nokia Devices and Services come together as an expanded family, we will unify our passion, dedication and commitment to bringing you the best of what our joint technologies have to offer.

Together, we can connect and empower people with one experience for everything in their life in a world where it is mobile first and cloud first.

From today onwards, the possibilities are endless. As now, we’re one!

Stephen

From #2: Conversations LIVE: Ask me anything with Stephen Elop [Conversations : now part of Microsoft, April 28, 2014]

Microsoft Mobile Oy is a legal construct that was created to facilitate the merger. It is not a brand that will be seen by consumers. The Nokia brand is available to Microsoft to use for its mobile phones products for a period of time, but Nokia as a brand will not be used for long going forward for smartphones. Work is underway to select the go forward smartphone brand.

Re: Will Microsoft keep up the innovation and pace that Nokia has set with the line of Lumia devices?

I think we can go even further than that. By combining with MSFT, we will each be able to innovate together in ways that we could not as separate companies. Lots of good things ahead.

Re: Why did you not make the 1020 with a better photo processing like in the original 808 dedicated image processor?

Great question because it highlights the benefits of the acquisition of Nokia. The 1020 is consistently rated as one of the best camera phones. But, we could have gone further if the engineering teams between MSFT and Nokia were not in separate companies. As we come together, innovation will be able to move faster.

Re: As the Executive VP of MS Devices how do you see the future of the integration and cloud utilization between Windows, Windows Phone and Xbox devices going. What would you like to see happen?

I think that people are looking for and deserve a consistent and continuous experience across their different devices and platforms. A good example of this today is Onedrive, where i have consistent access to my stuff across all of my devices. Same thing with Skype.

Re: How about Nokia X future after acquisition?

Microsoft acquired the mobile phones business, inclusive of Nokia X, to help connect the next billion people to Microsoft’s services. Nokia X uses the MSFT cloud, not Google’s. This is a great opportunity to connect new customers to Skype, outlook.com and Onedrive for the first time. We’ve already seen tens of thousands of new subscribers on MSFT services.

Re: When will we get the first Microsoft branded Smartphone?

Now that we are One company, the marketing and product folks will lay in the plans for the shift to a consistent brand. While we are not ready to share precise details, i can assure you that it will not be the “Nokia Lumia 1020 with Windows Phone on the AT&T LTE Network” … too many words! That somehow doesn’t roll off the tongue…

Re: What is going to happen to Nokia Mixradio, Nokia TV, Nokia Camera apps and other Nokia apps in Lumia phones. Are they gonna disappear. Which one, Nokia or Microsoft, is going to continue developing and updating them?

We have been building a lot of app’s that have been specific to Lumia, but now those people and efforts will transfer to MSFT. We believe that these types of capabilities are critical to differentiation, so you will see these themes continue.

Re: Do you think that Nokia with Android is a good idea?

When we made the decision to focus on Windows Phone back in 2011, we were very concerned that a decision to pursue Android would put us on a collision course with Samsung, who already had established a head of steam around Android. That was the right decision, as we have seen virtually all other OEMs from those days pushed to the side. Today, we are using AOSP to attack a specific market opportunity, but we are being thoughtful to do it in a way that accrues benefit to Microsoft and to Lumia.

Re: How are other smartphone manufacturers encouraged to produce or keep producing Windows Phone devices? I can imagine they fear that a lot of Windows Phone APIs will be available for Microsoft Devices only.

Really good question. It is GOOD for Microsoft to encourage other OEMs to also build WP devices, and there have been some announcements in this direction recently. Our intent is for the Microsoft Devices Group to “make the market” so that others can participate, so we will be doing things to facilitate other OEMs as much as possible.

Re: One of Nokia’s strengths is its truly global presence, moreso in emerging markets. I believe it responds faster than Microsoft in this regard. Can we expect better localization in these markets in terms of services?

Both Nokia and Microsoft are global companies, but it turns out that our strengths are complementary. We have great strength in emerging markets while Microsoft has more strength in developed markets. I think this will work well together.

Re: What is the future of innovation/new technologies worked at Nokia R&D dep. as solar charging (wyps) or radio waves charging on Lumia? Will be a move of these project (and others) to Microsoft R&D to allow future innovation just like Nokia did through the years?

When I first started at Nokia, i characterized the “landscape of unpolished gems” when looking at all the great R&D within Nokia. Now, combined with Microsoft, that landscape is even broader, which is very exciting for all of us. So, stay tuned to lots of innovation ahead.

Re: As a blogger and long-time time Nokia fan, Nokia Connects (WOMWorld) have been helpful, appreciative to us in many ways particularly in providing review products and services of Nokia. Unlike Nokia Connects, Microsoft Social team is aloof and uncaring. I would to like know the future of Nokia Connects and Nokia Conversations because both are important to us especially to the fans, evangelists.

Today we are part of Microsoft, and Conversations is with us (actually, sitting right next to me!). And this will continue. I strongly believe in an open and transparent dialogue, and am proud that the team made Nokia Conversations one of the most influential company and technology blogs in the world.

Everything just became a lot #MoreColorful [Conversations : now part of Microsoft, April 28, 2014]

What does color mean to you? Does it spark emotion? Does it invoke taste? Does it change your mood? Do you express yourself through color?

Color runs through our devices; it’s part of our DNA. From the bright and bold Nokia X family to the metallic-fused Lumia 930, our colors draw attention and make heads turn. It’s what sets us apart from our competitors and what many of you love about our design ethos.

We’re not like everybody else. Are you?

Not Like Everybody Else [Nokia YouTube channel, April 28, 2014]

Today, everything just became a lot more colorful. You can read more about Nokia Devices and Services coming together with Microsoft here. Soundtrack: The Kinks, ‘Not Like Everybody Else’.

Our journey begins [Conversations : now part of Microsoft, April 25, 2014]

Today is a big, new and exciting day for us. We are announcing that the acquisition of substantially all of the Nokia Devices and Services business by Microsoft has reached completion, following approval by Nokia shareholders and regulatory authorities.

For our readers here on Conversations and our fans across the world, today is a beginning of something new. But we’re happy to report that many of those things that matter to you most will stay the same.

As Microsoft, we will continue to produce, sell and support the phones and devices you have come to love, including our award-winning Lumia and Asha ranges, feature phones and the Nokia X family of devices.

The hardware engineering and design talent that produced world-leading devices under Nokia ownership will continue to set the mark for new mobile experiences and innovation.

And the software innovation continues too. The unique imaging, music and location experiences that are such a valuable part of our devices will continue to be developed, supported and enhanced.  Software updates and the continued growth of our app and device ecosystems are now more important than ever.

Importantly for existing customers, we will bring you right along with us. Your device warranty is completely unaffected by this change and the same world-class customer service and support teams will continue to look after your devices. You can still get all the help and support through the usual channels: online support, contact centers and local Nokia Care points.

And we’ll continue to take good care of your personal data – our commitment to your privacy remains paramount.

Your friends at Conversations will still be here, too, along with the social channels you follow. The Conversations blog and discussions forums, together with country-specific Facebook pages and Twitter accounts will continue to offer news and information about our devices and services, run by the same people and teams now at Microsoft.

Nokia’s global Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube accounts, as well as Nokia Finland’s Facebook and Twitter accounts, will have news and updates both from Nokia as a company and about Nokia-branded devices and services from Microsoft.

So today, most things will remain the same.

But today is also an exciting day for us, and a historic day for the industry. And none of this would be possible if it weren’t for you – our readers and fans across the world. We have experienced many things together and we hope you join us on this exciting journey too!

About Nacsa Sándor

Lazure Kft. • infokommunikációs felhő szakértés • high-tech marketing • elérhetőség: snacsa@live.com Okleveles villamos és automatizálási mérnök (1971) Munkahelyek: Microsoft, EMC, Compaq és Digital veterán. Korábban magyar cégek (GDS Szoftver, Computrend, SzáMOK, OLAJTERV). Jelenleg Lazure Kft. Amire szakmailag büszke vagyok (időrendben visszafelé): – Microsoft .NET 1.0 … .NET 3.5 és Visual Studio Team System bevezetések Magyarországon (2000 — 2008) – Digital Alpha technológia vezető adatközponti és vállalati szerver platformmá tétele (másokkal együttes csapat tagjaként) Magyarországon (1993 — 1998) – Koncepcionális modellezés (ma használatos elnevezéssel: domain-driven design) az objektum-orientált programozással kombinált módon (1985 — 1993) – Poszt-graduális képzés a miniszámítógépes szoftverfejlesztés, konkurrens (párhuzamos) programozás és más témákban (1973 — 1984) Az utóbbi időben általam művelt területek: ld. lazure2.wordpress.com (Experiencing the Cloud) – Predictive strategies based on the cyclical nature of the ICT development (also based on my previous findings during the period of 1978 — 1990) – User Experience Design for the Cloud – Marketing Communications based on the Cloud
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