The lost U.S. grip on the mobile computing market, including not only the device business, but software development and patterns of use in general

This is my conclusion after the two sections of analysis presented below:

I. China-based white-box tablet and smartphone vendors were shaping the 2013 global device market which will even more so in 2014

II. Asia is following different patterns of mobile use than the United States – the case of China and South Korea

The single, most forceful evidence for all of the above is the extraordinary presentation of Hugo Barra, Vice President, Xiaomi Global & Loic Le Meur, LeWeb Founders- LeWeb’13 Paris – [LeWebYouTube channel, Dec 11, 2013]

Hugo is a good friend of LeWeb, having joined us several times during his time at Google. This year he updates us on his new role at Xiaomi, running their product portfolio and operations in all markets outside Mainland China. He shares his views on the tech sector in China and where it is headed.



I. China-based white-box tablet vendors and smartphone vendors were shaping the 2013 global device market which will even more so in 2014

My analysis of the smartphone market in general was first presented in the Device businesses should have a China-based independent headquarter at least for Asia/Pacific if they want to succeed [‘Experiencing the Cloud’, Jan 28, 2014] and then it was already updated by the recent Chinese smartphone brands to conquer the global market? [‘Experiencing the Cloud’, March 18, 2014] post of mine.

As a Q4’13 update to The tablet market in Q1-Q3’13: It was mainly shaped by white-box vendors while Samsung was quite successfully attacking both Apple and the white-box vendors with triple digit growth both worldwide and in Mainland China [‘Experiencing the Cloud’, Nov 14, 2013] post of mine I should first add here the following analysis:

image
Note that the white-box tablet shipments from China were estimated by company data and Credit Suisse estimates as 7% and 10% higher: 2012: 58M (vs. 54.4M here), 2013: 98M (vs. 89.1M here) (as per the “Figure 30” chart in this blog below). As you see here and later on the conclusion of the Q1-Q3’13 analysis for the tablet market, represented by the title of the previous post will hold for the whole CY2013 as well. The only remarkable change is the sudden jump in Apple iPad sales in Q4, both worldwide and in China. This is, however, only attributed to Q4 introduction of the new iPad Air which was much anticipated for months, thus postponement of new purchases and the peak when it was available. So, for the whole year, my conclusion still holds true,

imageNote that the 2013 tablet market in China was 17.2M as per the above data, while the 2013 worldwide tablet market was 219.5M per IDC, and 255M according to company data and Credit Suisse estimates (as per the “Figure 30” chart in this blog below). So China was just 7.8% or 6.4% of the worldwide tablet market, while China shipped significantly more, 38.4% of the worldwide tablet market by the Chinese white-box vendors only (the last one according to company data and Credit Suisse estimates). This is 5.5% higher than the share of China-based smartphone vendors in the global 2013 smartphone shipments (32.9%, according to DIGITIMES Research—see well below), although in tablet space only Lenovo was a significant player, while in smartphones Huawei, ZTE, Coolpad and TCL were also signicant ones (being actually in the global Top 10). In addition a much higher portion of that was shipped internally:  about 50% according to company data and Credit Suisse estimates (as per the “Figure 25” chart in this blog below), while for tablets 3M local brand tablets were shipped (as per Analysys International, see the above chart) against 98M of white-box tablets only (as per company data and Credit Suisse estimates), i.e. around 3%. Even taking the DIGITIMES Research’ 54.4M white-box tablet shipment data as the basis, this number will only climb to around 5.5%.

image

image

image

image


Then I need to add here some external analysis as well, for both the smartphone and tablet markets:

From Taiwan Display IC Sector [Credit Suisse Equity research, March 12, 2014]

[p. 10] … We are … seeing entry level tablet shifting from 7″ to 8″ with higher resolutions given the competition from large size smartphone (Phablet). Tablet brands also plan to introduce over 10″ models for more commercial applications. …

China smartphone will continue to proliferate

Credit Suisse Global Research team estimates global smartphone shipment growth of 18% CAGR in 2013-2016E, while China build smartphone shipment (domestic and export) will see 29% CAGR in 2013-16E. For 2014, we forecast total China smartphone DDI [Display Driver IC] demand of 650-700mn units, up 33-36% YoY, and panel resolution to see faster migration on aggressive pricing and less capacity constraint …

image

image

[p. 10] Tablet unit demand still solid in 2014 post strong 2013

Tablet set shipment growth is expected to slow down in 2014 (34% YoY) after a strong 57% YoY growth in 2013 and 107% YoY growth in 2012. However, we believe Chinese tablet makers (brand and whitebox) … will outgrow the industry thanks to further cost reduction …

image

[p. 11] We estimate there will be limited growth for high-end or branded tablets in 2014, with the exception of Samsung (60% YoY growth). We believe the overall tablet demand will be driven by the Chinese, such as Lenovo and whitebox makers.

image
[2011: 73M*, 2012: 163M, 2013: 255M, 2014E: 342M]
* Samsung’s own data: 2010: 1.5M, 2011: 5.8M, 2012: 16.6M
** Note that the white-box tablet shipments were estimated by DIGITIMES Research as lower: 2012: 54.4M (vs. 58M here), 2013: 89.1M (vs. 98M here)
(as per the 1st chart in this blog above)


2014 China smartphone market and industry – Forecast and analysis [DIGITIMES Research, March 24, 2014]

imageDigitimes Research expects demand in the domestic China market to reach 422 million smartphones in 2014, with 278 million units contributed by China-based smartphone vendors. The continued expansion by international vendors Samsung and Apple will push up their sales to almost 144 million units, accounting for nearly 4% growth from 2013. As competition in the local market heats up, China-based vendors are turning to overseas markets in order to maintain their shipment volumes, especially taking an aggressive approach to penetrating emerging markets, which hold higher barriers for overseas vendors to enter.

The outlook for the 2014 China domestic smartphone market is that fewer local brands will remain to compete in the market. With the general enhancement of software-hardware specifications in 2013, brand-building and channel management have become the key to sustainability. Vendors without the advantage of substantial product differentiation will face the challenge of being eliminated in the short term. On the other hand, local vendors need to deal with inventories with discretion to counter the vigorous attacks initiated by international vendors in the domestic market.

In terms of the China smartphone industry, Digitimes Research expects global shipments of China-based smartphone vendors to reach 412 million units in 2014, a 30.7% increase from 2013. Overseas shipments will account for about 126 million units. While shipments to mature markets are expected to grow on a small scale, shipments to emerging markets are expected to expand at strong rates, mainly due to the low base they are starting from.

In the forecast for shipments from different vendors in 2014, Lenovo and Huawei are expected to reach 50 million units. Huawei has been engaged in overseas markets for a long time so its export portion outweighs Lenovo’s. ZTE’s and CoolPad‘s shipments are expected to reach 35.5 million units. TCL [Alcatel] has shown a significant growth in exports with shipments expected to exceed 26 million units in 2014, ranking No. 5 on the list. Second-tier vendors Gionee and Xiaomi are expected to ship 20 million units.

Digitimes Research: China smartphone shipments to decline slightly in 1Q14 [DIGITIMES Research, Feb 7, 2014]

China-based handset companies are expected to see their shipments of smartphones decline lightly in the first quarter of 2014, after combined shipments posted a 13% sequential growth in the previous quarter, according to Digitimes Research.

Efforts by brand vendors to clear out entry-level models in previous quarters and increased overseas shipments by Huawei, ZTE and TCL contributed to shipment gains the fourth quarter of 2013.

Additionally, first- and second-tier vendors also launched a number of new models in the fourth quarter to meet demand during the year-end buying season, ramping up total shipments in the quarter.

For all of 2013, China-based handset makers shipped a total of 314 million smartphones, increasing 62.4% from a year earlier, Digitimes Research said.

Second-tier vendors, including Xiaomi Technology, TCL, Oppo Mobile and Gionee managed to ship over 15 million smartphones in 2013.

Digitimes Research: Global smartphone shipments to top 1.24 billion units in 2014 [DIGITIMES Research, Jan 14, 2014]

Global smartphone shipments are expected to top 1.24 billion units in 2014, with Samsung Electronics, Apple, LG Electronics, Sony Mobile Communications, Lenovo, Huawei, Microsoft, ZTE, Coolpad and TCL serving as top-10 vendors, according to Digitimes Research.

Apple may see its shipments double in 2014 largely due to increased shipments to China and Japan as it will benefit from its cooperation with the largest telecom operators in the two countries, said Digitimes Research.

The growth rate for Samsung will be limited in 2014 as its sales in the US, China and Japan will be depressed by growing popularity of iPhones.

China-based Lenovo, Huawei and Coolpad are expected to step up their efforts to boost sales in overseas markets after being enlisted among the top-10 vendors due to higher shipment volumes in the home market in China.

However, TCL and ZTE will continue to ship smartphones to overseas markets mainly, but will also strengthen sales in China, with domestic sales to account for less than 50% of their total shipments in 2014, commented Digitimes Research.

2014 global smartphone market forecast [DIGITIMES Research, Jan 7, 2014]

imageIn 2014, smartphones are expected to continue penetrating rapidly into emerging markets such as Russia, India, Indonesia and Latin America, while China’s smartphone shipments will see weakened on-year growth in the year, but still enormous volume. This report will provide in-depth analyses to forecast whether global smartphone shipments in 2014 will maintain a growth similar to that of 2013 and what the global shipment scale will reach in 2014.

Within the top-10 smartphone vendors in 2013, four of them are from China and in 2014 more China-based vendors are expected to enter the top 10. This report will also analyze which China-based vendors will have the best chance to become parts of the top-tier players.

How Microsoft’s acquisition of Nokia’s handset business will affect Windows Phone products’ shipment growth in 2014 and shake Android and iOS’ domination in the smartphone market, as well as the possibility of Amazon and Facebook joining the smartphone competition in 2014 and their potential influence to the market will also be analyzed within the report.

Digitimes Research: Global smartphone shipments to reach 1.24 billion in 2014 [DIGITIMES Research, Nov 25, 2013]

Global smartphone shipments are expected to reach about 1.24 billion in 2014, up 30% on year [i.e. 954M in 2013], according to Digitimes Research.

The increase in growth is expected to be driven by demand in Russia, India, Indonesia and Latin America countries.

Digitimes Research believes that Samsung Electronics will lead the way in shipments followed by Apple, LG Electronics, Sony, Lenovo, Huawei Device, Microsoft, ZTE, Coolpad and TCL [Alcatel].

Android and IOS operating systems are expected to be used in about 93% of the devices shipped in 2014, added Digitimes Research.


Global tablet market – 4Q 2013 [DIGITIMES Research, March 24, 2014]

image

Global tablet shipments grew 25% sequentially and 29.8% on year to reach 78.45 million units in the fourth quarter of 2013 benefiting mainly by economic recoveries of Europe and North America, which relatively boosted demand during the year-end holidays.

Digitimes Research: Global tablet shipments in 1Q14 to drop over 20% sequentially [DIGITIMES Research, Jan 27, 2014]

An estimated 62.14 million tablets will ship globally in the first quarter of 2014, decreasing 20.8% on quarter but increasing 10.9% on year, according to Digitimes Research.

iPads will account for 29% of shipments, brand models launched by vendors other than Apple for 36.7%, and models launched by white-box vendors for 34.3%, Digitimes Research indicated.

Of brand tablet shipments in particular, Android-based models will take up 50.5%, iOS-based 44.1% and Windows-based 5.4%. 7.9-inch models will account for 24.8% of the shipments, followed by 7-inch models with 20.2%, 9-inch models with 19.6%, 10-inch models with 18.3% and 8-inch models with 15.3%. In terms of touch solutions, GFF will account for 47.8% of shipments, GF2 for 42.9%, OGS for 5.3%, GG for 2.7% and G1F for 1.3%.

Among vendors, Apple will have the largest global market share at 29%, followed by Samsung Electronics with 23.1%, Lenovo 4.7%, Asustek Computer 2.7%, Amazon 1%, Acer 1%, Microsoft 0.9%, Dell 0.8%, Google 0.5% and Hewlett-Packard 0.5%.

Taiwan-based ODMs/OEMs will ship 22.5 million tablets in the quarter, taking up 55.1% of total brand model shipments. Foxconn Electronics will account for 51.7% of shipments, Pegatron 34.8%, Compal Electronics 5.1%, Wistron 4.3% and Quanta Computer 4.1%.

Digitimes Research: Global tablet shipments in 4Q13 estimated at 78.45 million units [DIGITIMES Research, Jan 24, 2014]

There were an estimated 78.45 million tablets shipped globally in the fourth quarter of 2013, increasing 25% on quarter and by 29.8% on year, according to Digitimes Research.

iPads accounted for 29.7% of shipments, brand models launched by vendors other than Apple for 36.6%, and models launched by white-box vendors for 33.8%, Digitimes Research indicated. Android-based models took up 51.2% of the shipments, iOS-based 44.9% and Windows-based 3.9%. 7-inch models accounted for 31% of the shipments, followed by 9-inch models with 25.4%, 7.9-inch models with 19.7%, 10-inch models with 15.8% and 8-inch models with 7.6%. In terms of touch solutions, GF2 accounted for 41.5% of shipments, GFF for 38.6%, OGS for 9.8% and GG for 9.5%.

Among vendors, Apple had the largest global market share at 29.7%, followed by Samsung Electronics with 17.4%, Amazon 5.4%, Lenovo 4.2%, Asustek Computer 2.8%, Google 1.4%, Acer 1%, Dell 0.8% and Hewlett-Packard 0.5%.

Taiwan-based ODMs/OEMs shipped 32.8 million tablets in the fourth quarter, with Foxconn Electronics accounting for 52.7%, Pegatron 24.4%, Compal Electronics 12%, Quanta Computer 6.6% and Wistron 4.2%.



II. Asia is following different patterns of mobile use than the United States – the case of China and South Korea

The Post-PC Era: Is the U.S. losing its grip on the software industry? [Flurry Blog, Aug 29, 2013]

image

Just five years ago, PCs reigned supreme and so did the US software industry. In 2008, U.S. companies produced an estimated 65% of all PC software units sold on a worldwide basis.

In only half a decade, smartphones, tablets, and perhaps most importantly, apps, have changed the nature of the software industry. In this post we look at where apps are being developed and used and discuss the implications of that for the Post-PC Era software industry.

More Apps Are Now Being Created Outside The U.S. Than Inside The U.S.

… By June of this year only 36% of the apps we measure were made in the U.S.A. …

U.S. Made Apps Still Dominate App Engagement, But Their Share Is Slipping

imageOf course, some apps enjoy much greater use than others, so we next considered how the picture changes if apps are weighted by total time, which takes into account both user numbers and engagement. Once time is taken into account, things look considerably better for the U.S., suggesting that, on average, user numbers or engagement are greater for apps made in the U.S. than for apps created elsewhere. That makes sense given the size of the U.S. population, the fact that it was an app pioneer country, and the number of English speakers in other countries who might be able to use U.S.-made apps without any localization. Nonetheless, even the weighted percentage of apps made in the U.S.A. has dropped in the past year.

Use of Local Apps Is Strong In China

This should not lull U.S. app developers into a false sense of security however. That becomes evident from examining where the apps used by people in particular countries are made. That’s what the chart below does, starting with the United States. Nearly sixty percent (59%) of the time U.S. users spend in apps is spent in apps developed domestically, meaning that more than 40% of the app time of U.S. consumers is already spent in apps developed in other countries.

And while U.S. made apps are used elsewhere, unsurprisingly, people in many other countries spend a significant amount of their app time in apps developed in their home countries. For example, 13% of the time spent in apps in the UK is spent in apps made in the UK and 8% of the time spent in apps in Brazil is spent in apps made in Brazil. But as is so often the case, it’s China where things get really interesting. Nearly two-thirds of the time spent in apps in China is spent in apps made in China. U.S. made apps only account for 16% of total time spent in apps in China. The size and growth rate of the Chinese app market imply that the worldwide share of time spent in apps that are produced in the U.S. can be expected to contract further.


China Report: Device and App Trends in the #1 Mobile Market [Flurry Blog, July 23, 2013]

image

In June of this year Flurry Analytics measured 261,333,271 active smartphones and tablets in China. That represented a whopping 24% of the entire worldwide connected device installed base measured by Flurry.
image
Smartphones and tablets are not just about fun and games in China. Compared to iOS device owners elsewhere, the average time Chinese owners spend using Books, Newsstand, Utility, and Productivity apps is greater than the rest of the world (1.8x, 1.7x, 2.3x, and 2.1x respectively). On average Chinese owners of Android devices spend more than seven times as much time in Finance apps (7.4x) than Android owners elsewhere spend in Finance apps, but they also spend more time in Entertainment apps (1.7x).

The South Korea Report: Device and App Trends in The First Saturated Device Market [Flurry Blog, Oct 14, 2013]

image

In August of this year Flurry Analytics measured 33,527,534 active smartphones and tablets in South Korea. While that was only 2.8% of the entire worldwide connected device installed base Flurry measures, South Korea is an important market for connected devices for several reasons. First, it is the first connected device market in the world to approach saturation. Second, it is Samsung’s home market, and largely as a consequence of that, more of the devices in use there are manufactured by domestic firms than is the case for any other country. Finally, it is home to more phablet fans than anywhere else.

imageSocial networking accounts for a significant share of app activity in South Korea, as it does in many other countries. Tool apps are used heavily by South Korean Android users, and entertainment apps capture a lot of time spent in iOS apps.

Compared to app users elsewhere, South Koreans over-index on Entertainment apps on iOS and several Android app categories (Media / Video, Photography, Lifestyle, Shopping, and Tools).

Given that South Korea’s rapid period of connected device growth was ushered in by the phablet, it is perhaps not surprising that it continues to surpass the rest of the world in its preference for that form factor. As shown below, in a worldwide sample of 97,963 iOS and Android devices, only 7% were phablets, but for South Korea that percentage was 41%. The appeal of phablets in South Korea appears to suppress the tablet market there. Worldwide, 19% of the devices in our sample were tablets compared to only 5% in South Korea.

image



Worldwide:

Size Matters for Connected Devices. Phablets Don’t. [Flurry Blog, April 1, 2013]

image

image

image

… For this study, we focused on the top 200 device models, as measured by active users in Flurry’s system, which represent more than 80% of all usage. Doing so, five groups emerged based on screen size:

1. Small phones (e.g., most Blackberries), 3.5” or under screens
2. Medium phones (e.g., iPhone), between 3.5” – 4.9” screens
3. Phablets (e.g., Galaxy Note), 5.0” – 6.9” screens
4. Small Tablets (e.g., Kindle Fire), 7.0” – 8.4” screens
5. Full-size tablets (e.g., the iPad), 8.5” or greater screens

The ‘Is it a phone or is it a tablet’ devices otherwise known as phablets have attracted interest, but currently command a relatively small share (2%) of the device installed base, and their share of active users and sessions is also relatively small.

Android owns the phablet market and also has the greatest proportion of devices using small tablets. iOS has the greatest share of active devices using large tablets.

… notice that nearly a third of time spent playing games take places on larger devices, namely full-sized tablet, small tablets and phablets. And while they command consumer time spent, they represented only 15% of device models in use in February and 21% of individual connected devices. These differences are statistically significant.

Studying books and videos, it’s somewhat surprising that tablets, which possess larger screens, do not see a larger proportion of time spent. An explanation for the high concentration in time spent in smartphones could be that consumers watch videos from their smartphones on-the-go (e.g., commuting to work on public transit), whereas they opt for a bigger screen to watch video (e.g., computer or TV) when at work or home. We expect that tablets may represent a greater share of time spent in book and video apps in the future as tablet ownership expands and tablet owners branch out into more types of apps.

From our study, consumers most prefer and use apps on medium-sized smartphones such as the Samsung Galaxy smartphones and full-sized tablets like the iPad.  In particular, smaller smartphones under-index in terms of app usage compared to the proportion of the installed base they represent, and would suggest they are not worth developers’ support.

Mobile Use Grows 115% in 2013, Propelled by Messaging Apps [Flurry Blog, Jan 13, 2014]

image

… the segment that showed the most dramatic growth [worldwide] in 2013 was Messaging (Social and Photo sharing included). The growth in that segment should not come as a surprise to many, given the attention that messaging apps such as WhatsApp, WeChat, KakaoTalk, LINE, Facebook Messenger and SnapChat have received in the press. What is surprising, however, is that the rate of growth (tripling usage year-over-year) dramatically outpaced other popular categories. This type of growth could explain the high valuation Facebook has allegedly put on SnapChat, or Facebook’s rush to add direct messaging in Instagram, an app frequented by teens.

Another explosive growth year in mobile has passed. On December 31st, 2013 at 11:59 pm, Flurry Analytics tracked a record 4.7 Billion app sessions in a single day, for a total of 1.126 Trillion sessions for the whole year. Those are some very, very big numbers. …

The Truth About Cats and Dogs: Smartphone vs Tablet Usage Differences [Flurry Blog, Oct 29, 2012]

… Taking a snapshot in September 2012 from Flurry Analytics, that totaled more than 6 billion application sessions across approximately 500 million smart devices, Flurry provides a comprehensive comparison between smartphones and tablets, spanning age, gender, time of day usage, category usage and engagement metrics.  For age and gender comparisons, Flurry leverages a panel of more than 30 million consumers who have opted-in to share demographic data. …

The chart below compares the time spent across app categories between smartphones and tablets.   At a high level, consumers spend more time using tablets for media and entertainment, including Games (67%), Entertainment (9%) and News (2%) categories which account for nearly four-fifths of consumption on tabletsSmartphones claim a higher proportion of communication and task-oriented activities with Social Networking (24%), Utilities (17%), Health & Fitness (3%) and Lifestyle (3%) commanding nearly half of all usage on smartphones.  Games are the most popular category on both form factors with 67% of time spent using games on tablets and 39% of time spent using games on smartphones.  Further reinforcing that tablets are “media machines” is the fact that consumers spend 71% more of their time using games on tablets than they spend doing so on smartphones.

image

Indie Game Makers Dominate iOS and Android [Flurry Blog, March 6, 2012]

imageFor the first two months of 2012, Flurry Analytics measured that more than half of all end user sessions were spent in games. Across January and February, Flurry observed sessions across a sample of more than 64 billion applications sessions across more than 500 million iOS and Android devices.



United States
:

Apps Solidify Leadership Six Years into the Mobile Revolution [Flurry Blog, April 1, 2014]

imageLast year, on the eve of the fifth anniversary of the mobile revolution, Flurry issued its five-year report on the mobile industry. In that report we analyzed time-spent on mobile devices by the average US consumer. We have run the same analysis, using data collected between January and March of 2014, and found some interesting shifts that we are sharing in this report

imageThe chart below on the left takes a closer look at app categories. Comparing  them to last year, gaming apps maintained their leadership position at 32% of time spent. Social and messaging applications, including Facebook, increased share from 24% to 28%. Entertainement (including YouTube) and Utility applications maintained their positions at 8% each, while productivity apps saw their share double from 2% to 4% of the overall time spent.

Flurry Five-Year Report: It’s an App World. The Web Just Lives in It
[Flurry Blog, April 3, 2013]

… On the five-year anniversary of launching Flurry Analytics, we took some time to reflect on the industry and share some insights. First, we studied the time U.S. consumers spend between mobile apps and mobile browsers, as well as within mobile app categories. Let’s take a look. …

image

Mobile App Usage [in U.S.] Further Dominates Web, Spurred by Facebook [Flurry Blog, Jan 9, 2012]

image

The chart compares how daily interactive consumption has changed over the last 18 months between the web (both desktop and mobile web) and mobile native apps.  For the web, shown in green, we built a model using publicly available data from comScore and Alexa.  For mobile application usage, shown in blue, we used Flurry Analytics data, which tracks anonymous sessions across more than 140,000 applications.  We estimate this accounts for approximately one third of all mobile application activity, which we scaled-up accordingly for this analysis.

With mobile app usage soaring, Flurry additionally studied which categories most occupy consumers’ time.  The results are shown in the pie chart below.

imageFurther considering that Flurry does not track Facebook usage, the Social Networking category is actually larger.  Combined, from just what Flurry can see, these two categories control a whopping 79% of consumers’ total app time.  This breakdown in usage reveals Facebook’s inherent popularity as the leading social network, as well as how important controlling the game category is for all platform providers.  As we drill down into the category data, consumers use these two categories more frequently, and for longer average session lengths, compared to other categories.

About Nacsa Sándor

Lazure Kft. • infokommunikációs felhő szakértés • high-tech marketing • elérhetőség: snacsa@live.com Okleveles villamos és automatizálási mérnök (1971) Munkahelyek: Microsoft, EMC, Compaq és Digital veterán. Korábban magyar cégek (GDS Szoftver, Computrend, SzáMOK, OLAJTERV). Jelenleg Lazure Kft. Amire szakmailag büszke vagyok (időrendben visszafelé): – Microsoft .NET 1.0 … .NET 3.5 és Visual Studio Team System bevezetések Magyarországon (2000 — 2008) – Digital Alpha technológia vezető adatközponti és vállalati szerver platformmá tétele (másokkal együttes csapat tagjaként) Magyarországon (1993 — 1998) – Koncepcionális modellezés (ma használatos elnevezéssel: domain-driven design) az objektum-orientált programozással kombinált módon (1985 — 1993) – Poszt-graduális képzés a miniszámítógépes szoftverfejlesztés, konkurrens (párhuzamos) programozás és más témákban (1973 — 1984) Az utóbbi időben általam művelt területek: ld. lazure2.wordpress.com (Experiencing the Cloud) – Predictive strategies based on the cyclical nature of the ICT development (also based on my previous findings during the period of 1978 — 1990) – User Experience Design for the Cloud – Marketing Communications based on the Cloud
This entry was posted in Cloud Computing strategy, consumer computing, consumer devices, Geopolitics, Microsoft survival, Mobile Internet, smartphones, tablets and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to The lost U.S. grip on the mobile computing market, including not only the device business, but software development and patterns of use in general

  1. Pingback: Intel’s desperate attempt to establish a sizeable foothold on the tablet market until its 14nm manufacturing leadership could provide a profitable position for the company in 2016 | Experiencing the Cloud

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s