Marko Ahtisaari from Nokia and Steven Guggenheimer from Microsoft on the Internet of Things day of LeWeb Paris’12

Marko Ahtisaari: From the HERE location cloud, through design (principles) and new Lumia 620 announced, to the Internet of (Small) Things, or Nokia’s vision for IoT [leweb YouTube channel, Dec 5, 2012]

– [02:20] Now the Internet is everywhere around us on the multitude of devices.
– [02:40] We move forward … to an Internet of ten, twenty, thirty, forty smaller things that are on, in around us that are all connected to the Internet
– [03:48] So what kind of world we do want to have as we go forward is something where the technology allows us to reach each other remotely but doesn’t get in the way of human interaction and in that connection with the environment that we have every day. So that’s the first, I think, important shift when you’re talking about the Internet of Things. But the other, equallly important , is a return to the significance of place.
– [04:50] Now as we look at these devices that are increasingly packed with sensors, we know that they are aware and they know where they are. And all of these ten, twenty, imagethirty, forty things that we will have, on us, with us, will be located in a place. And to take advantage of that, to use location, if you like, as a lens for our activities and the experience we make, you need a digital model of the real world. And that’s what we’re building with what we have just recently recently announced as the HERE location cloud. [05:27]
[see:
Nokia redefines digital map landscape by introducing HERE as new brand for its location and mapping service [Nokia press release, Nov 13, 2012]
– HERE. City and Country Maps – Driving Directions – Satellite Views – Routes.
– HERE.
Developer Site.]
– [05:34] A real-time digital abstraction of the world, we call it HERE.
<from this on you should better watch the video about HERE>
– [10:08] <talk about design, you should watch as well> [10:55] The role of the architect and designer is to give a gentler structured life. The way I interpret that is that you focus on those things the people do fifty to hundred times a day, and you make them better. [11:10] <talk about design principles, continued now for Nokia smartphones> [14:06]
– [14:08] <talk about the new Lumia 620 announced on the scene> [19:45]
– When do you think the Internet of Things will be a reality?
[21:00] What you’re seeing now is the startups here are in the forefront. I think the key thing is to establish things that do one or two or three things, and do them extremely well. And for that we have these products here today. [21:28

Marko Ahtisaari, Executive Vice President, Design, Nokia… and introducing the brand new entry-level Lumia 620 as the manifestation of that Internet of SMALL Things as compact

Detailed information about the three subjects of his talk (or closely related), on my blog:

Nokia HERE Maps for everything, for FireFox OS in a strategic partnership with Mozilla [Nov 13, 2012]
The Where Platform from Nokia: a company move to taking data as a raw material to build products [April 7, 2012]
Nokia’s Lumia strategy is capitalizing on platform enhancement opportunities with location-based services, better photographic experience etc. [Jan 12 – April 27, 2012]
I WILL ADD TO THAT NOW:
Nokia HERE by Michael Halbherr [JB Su YouTube channel, Nov 15, 2012]

Nokia Design direction [Aug 1 – Oct 31, 2012]
Best practice industrial and user experience design – Nokia and Microsoft [Dec 17, 2011 – Jan 31, 2012]
Designing smarter phones–Marko Ahtisaari (Nokia) and Albert Shum (Microsoft) [Nov 23, 2011]
Nokia N9 UX [?Swipe?] on MeeGo 1.2 Harmattan [June 24, 2011 – Aug 10, 2012]
Nokia to enter design pattern competition for 2011 smartphones with MeeGo [Dec 9, 2010 – Jan 31, 2012]
– my detailed companion post on Lumia 620 giving also comparison with other WP8 Lumias: High-volume Nokia Lumia superphones with Windows Phone 8 extended on the top for China, and on the entry level needed for Asia and Middle-East as well [Dec 5, 2012]
Unique differentiators of Nokia Lumia 920/820 innovated for high-volume superphone markets of North America, Europe and elsewhere [Sept 6 – Nov 13, 2012]
Less focus on feature phones while extending the smartphones effort: further readjustments at Nokia [June 25 – Aug 9, 2012]
Nokia Lumia (Windows Phone 7) value proposition [Oct 26-28, 2011]

+ Nokia under transition (as reported by the company) [March 11 – 30, 2012]

+ Regarding the new products below the Windows Phone 8 based Lumias (Lumia 620 … Lumia 920) see:
With Asha Touch starting at $83 and Lumia at $186 Nokia targeting the entry-level and low-end smartphone markets–UPDATED [Dec 19, 2012] new entry prices and Lumia 505 (? $220 ?) with AMOLED ClearBlack and Gorilla Glass [Nov 1 – Dec 19, 2012]

france3 TV station put three questions to Ahtisaari after his keynote which shed more light on what is the connection of those things he was talking about to the subject of the Internet of Things:

Three questions to Marko Ahtisaari, Executive Vice President of NOKIA, and responsible for the Design 1. How the connected objects changed your life? 2. What is the connected object which you dream? 3. What will be your news in the next 12 months? Trois questions à Marko Ahtisaari, vice-président exécutif de NOKIA, et Responsable du Design 1. Comment les objets connectés ont-ils changé votre quotidien? 2. Quel est l’objet connecté dont vous revez? 3. Quelle va etre votre actualité dans les 12 prochains mois?

Strangely (or not, if taken otherwise) I could not find any written reports on the web about the HERE, the talk on design, only for the Lumia 620 announcement by Ahtisaari:

From The Australian report:

“It is a performance device in a compact package,” he said.

… the device does support Near Field Communication, which makes it possible for users to transmit data merely by tapping their phones or waving them near terminals equipped with the technology.

According to Mr Ahtisaari, when the phone goes on sale in January it will retail for $US249 ($238) before tax or subsidy. It will launch into the Asia Pacific region, the Middle East and Africa, before coming to Europe later.

“When we designed the Lumia family, we knew there was an opportunity for a more compact product,” he said. “But it still has the solid products like the camera and the signature apps we have developed like Maps, Drive, City Lens.

“We wanted something that was a bit more playful in a market that is essentially grey or black or white rectangles. We are introducing choice.”
The phone sits nicely in the hand and the high-colour gloss finishes have a richness which Mr Ahtisaari said was achieved by overlaying a translucent layer on top of an opaque layer.

From CNET report:

Marko Ahtisaari, Nokia’s executive vice president of design, put the new colors front and center as he unveiled the phone at the LeWeb conference here.

The phone comes in base colors, but using Nokia’s “dual shot” approach, transparent but colored covers that form new color combinations.

“With the 620, we wanted to introduce some bold blends,” Ahtisaari said. “We use a technique called dual-shot application of color, with an opaque layer underneath then a translucent layer above.” A yellow base becomes lime green with a cyan cover and orange with a red cover, for example.


Steven Guggenheimer: pretty clear Microsoft vision coming out of his discussion at LeWeb as:

– Huge ecosystem is the major attraction for partners
– Consistent UI across devices with choice in price, form factors and personalisation

CHOICE is indeed a unique proposition of Windows 8 for end-users, as it was well demonstrated (here just in form factors) by Microsoft on another event, the Gadget Show Live Christmas in UK (Dec 1, 2012). And keep in mind that this is just the beginning.

– Continuity in innovation while running an app on all those seemlessly
– Relieve HW manufacturers of the pretty painful extra SW work and bring more vendors to operators than just Apple and Samsung (even if Samsung will jump on the Windows bandwagon in full, in addition to Android) to select from, in particular Nokia as a big player
– CIOs getting cool devices that fit into enterprise IT in terms of security etc., while might be offered as real alternatives to iOS/iPad and Android devices to the end-users in terms of consumerization of IT
– Developers reusing their skills in the world of Windows embedded for IoT as well
– While Steven Sinofsky is a phenomenal visionary and shipper, one who ships products, but there is a great bench of executives, Julie Larsen Green, John DeVaan …, so the team is still there to continue on
– Enabling the digital world globally by serving the fastest growing markets of the developing world as well

Steven Guggenheimer, Corporate Vice President, Developer & Platform Evangelism Group, Microsoft & David Kirkpatrick, Founder & CEO, Techonomy Media. Questions from Kirkpatrick were: 1. [02:57] Why should we care about Microsoft and Windows? 2. [05:26] What is the case that you can really have a better phone, a better tablet than what Apple is making , and what Google is making and licensing? 3. [07:12] What is the most amazing stuff we are going to see as consumers, as employees on these phones and tablets, that we can’t do on the other products? What is the differentiated selling proposition? 4. [09:19] What is the next phase beyond the little rectangle of glass we carry on in or pocket? 5. [11:36] The trade-off required from the HW vendors for this, does it frustrate them, or you feel they can be completely fine with it? … with some going with Android … Samsung we have seen making big-big play on Android. 6. [13:04] How big of a potential partner is Samsung for you? … [13:45] Presumably there is a huge opportunity for you guys … to get a swing in effect. 7. [14:50] Operators might want a third choice [vs. Apple and Samsung only] but if Windows 8 starts to really take-off … Samsung will just go right there and that does not really help the operators in that respect. [Your opinion?] … [15:35] Operators in a way are key ally for you. 8. [15:55] CIOs are clearly another huge ally of yours. … Tell us a few of the reasons why. 9. [17:30] How is IoT fit into Windows 8 pitch? 10. [19:40] What does it [Sinofsky being forced out] do to the shape of Microsoft? What was your reaction to Sinofsky leaving? How big the deal is it for the company? 11. [20:58] How do you think about global and the developing worlds’ importance in terms of what you are doing?

Detailed information about the subjects of this discussion (or essentially related, as that of Intel), on my blog:
Boosting both the commodity and premium brand markets in 2013 with much more smartphones and tablets while the Windows notebook shipments will shrink by 2% [Nov 20, 2012]
Giving up the total OEM reliance strategy: the Microsoft Surface tablet [June 19 – July 30, 2012]
The future of Windows Embedded: from standalone devices to intelligent systems [March 9-29, 2012]
Steven Sinofsky, ex Microsoft: The victim of an extremely complex web of the “western world” high-tech interests [Nov 13, 2012]
Microsoft Surface with some questions about the performance and smoothness of the experience [Nov 12, 2012]
Microsoft Surface: its premium quality/price vs. even iPad3 [Oct 26, 2012]
Microsoft Surface: First media reflections after the New-York press launch [Oct 26, 2012]
ASUS: We are the real transformers, not Microsoft [Oct 17, 2012]
Urgent search for an Intel savior [Nov 21, 2012]
Intel Haswell: “Mobile computing is not limited to tiny, low-performing devices” [Nov 15, 2012]
Can VIA Technologies save the mobile computing future of the x86 (x64) legacy platform? [Nov 23, 2012]
AMD 2012-13: a new Windows 8 strategy expanded with ultra low-power APUs for the tablets and fanless clients [Feb 3, 2012]
BUILD 2012: Notes on Day 1 and 2 Keynotes [Oct 31, 2012]
Acer Iconia W510: Windows 8 Clover Trail (Intel Z2760) hybrid tablets from OEMs [Oct 28, 2012]
NOOK Media LLC: the finalization of the strategic joint venture between Barnes & Noble and Microsoft [Oct 6, 2012]
The cloud experience vision of .NET by Microsoft 12 years ago and its delivery now with Windows Azure, Windows 8/RT, Windows Phone, iOS and Android among others [Sept 16-20, 2012]

I searched the web for reports on that discussion and attributed that to the questions shown above. It’s quite typical that there were only two reports, the TechCrunch one just simply copied in quite a number of others. As you could see these two reports are also just focusing on certain questions and also reporting on them in a kind of distorted/biased way. So I will recommend read once again my concise summary of the microsoft vision as truly represented by Guggenheimer and watch the video record as well (if you have not done so yet).

Here is what I’ve found:

1. [02:57] Why should we care about Microsoft and Windows? 
TechCrunch’s summary of the answers:

Starting off the discussion, Kirkpatrick noted how Microsoft is still unsurpassed in the enterprise and how its successes like Xbox and Kinect reflect on the company’s strengths. At the same time, though, many people remain very skeptical about the company’s future – especially in the startup and developer community. Asked about why we should care about Microsoft and Windows 8, Guggenheimer noted that the company’s scale, including the millions of PCs that are expected to sell next year, make it an interested target for developers. He also stressed how the Windows store charges developers less than most other stores (especially for developers with sales over $25,000) and offers them access to a broader hardware ecosystem and access to significantly more eyeballs than other platforms.

memburn’s summary of the answers:

In one word: “opportunity.” Guggenheimer confirmed that some 1500 devices have been certified for Windows 8 already… and it only launched in October. The potential for growth is massive. Users can upgrade from older versions of Windows or buy a new device: and Windows 8 runs on tablets, laptops, desktop computers and smartphones. Whether the adoption curve will really spike as high as Microsoft hopes it will remains to be seen, but this is a key point for major app developers: they won’t build for a platform that no one is using, or for one where they can’t guarantee the best possible experience for their users.

Guggenheimer says that if developers want hundreds of millions of devices to have the potential to access their apps, Windows 8 is the way to go. He also stressed the flexibility of the company’s system. For example, developers can use Microsoft’s engine to accept payments from users, or they can use their own.

2. [05:26] What is the case that you can really have a better phone, a better tablet than what Apple is making , and what Google is making and licensing?
3. [07:12] What is the most amazing stuff we are going to see as consumers, as employees on these phones and tablets, that we can’t do on the other products? What is the differentiated selling proposition?
TechCrunch’s summary of the answers:

Kirkpatrick pushed Guggenheimer to explain why Microsoft’s products are better and why developers – and consumers – should care. Guggenheimer took the standard Microsoft line here and argued that the company’s new products like Windows 8 and Windows Phone 8 offer a more personalized experience (he was clearly referring to the live tiles here) and a broader choice of form factors and price points than its competitors. It’s clear that for Guggenheimer, who previously focused on hardware, after all, the wide variety of hardware devices in the Windows ecosystem is a major selling point. This holiday, he said, will be interesting, but we will see thousands of devices in all kinds of sizes and designs by next year.

memburn’s summary of the answers:

“For the individual, it’s the personalised setup,” said Guggenheimer. There is a “constantly updating customised screen”, a number of devices at a range of price points and the choice of more and more phones, tablets, laptops and desktop computers. “Give hardware manufacturers a year with Windows 8, and you’ll see hundreds of thousands of devices,” said Guggenheimer.

While the devices come in every shape, size and colour, he said they have one thing in common: a consistent user experience. “As developers, when you build an app, it runs on all of those [devices],” said Guggenheimer.

5. [11:36] The trade-off required from the HW vendors for this, does it frustrate them, or you feel they can be completely fine with it? … with some going with Android … Samsung we have seen making big-big play on Android.
memburn’s summary of the answers:

He sees it as a middle ground between Android and Apple’s strategies:

  1. Apple’s model: Build all the hardware so all the software will run on the machines, but only offer consumers a limited choice of devices
  2. Android’s model: While manufacturers can build any hardware they like, the software experience is not consistent over all devices. It’s lead to the dreaded f-word that is a major drawback for Android users: fragmentation.
  3. Microsoft’s model: Partner with manufacturers and provide enough definitions for the hardware so that there are set standards, so all the applications will run on every device, but still offer the customers a wide product range.

10. [19:40] What does it [Sinofsky being forced out] do to the shape of Microsoft? What was your reaction to Sinofsky leaving? How big the deal is it for the company?
TechCrunch’s summary of the answers:

Kirkpatrick, of course, also used this opportunity to ask about Steven Sinofsky’s unexpected exit from Microsoft just days after the launch of Windows 8. According to Guggenheimer, Sinofsky is a “phenomenal visionary” and “phenomenal shipper.” While Kirkpatrick insinuated that Sinofsky was pushed out, Guggenheimer obviously wouldn’t say so and just reiterated Microsoft’s company line that he “decided to leave.” “We’ll miss Steven,” he said, but he also argued that Microsoft has a very deep bench of executive talent.

memburn’s summary of the answers:

The quick departure of the former President of the Windows Division just days after the launch of the OS he helped design has sparked lots of rumours about whether he left voluntarily or was pushed out. Guggenheimer didn’t elaborate on exactly what happened, but he admits that while they’ll “miss him” and “he did great things” at Microsoft, “we have a great bench — the team under Steven is still there.”

11. [20:58] How do you think about global and the developing worlds’ importance in terms of what you are doing?
memburn’s summary of the answers:

With the range of low and high-end devices and partnerships with major international manufacturers, Guggenheimer seems to think the answer to that question is ‘yes’. He said that they’re focusing on the shift: the market in countries like China has outstripped places like the US, and Microsoft is aiming to enable the digital world globally. He said that international expansion is not an obstacle for developers, stating simply that “if you develop for Windows, it’s going to work in 200 countries.”

And finally see what was shown by Microsoft at LeWeb 2012 [Charbax, Dec 8, 2012]

Microsoft is showing off Surface RT, Windows Phone 8, Windows 8, a bunch of devices running these.

About Nacsa Sándor

Lazure Kft. • infokommunikációs felhő szakértés • high-tech marketing • elérhetőség: snacsa@live.com Okleveles villamos és automatizálási mérnök (1971) Munkahelyek: Microsoft, EMC, Compaq és Digital veterán. Korábban magyar cégek (GDS Szoftver, Computrend, SzáMOK, OLAJTERV). Jelenleg Lazure Kft. Amire szakmailag büszke vagyok (időrendben visszafelé): – Microsoft .NET 1.0 … .NET 3.5 és Visual Studio Team System bevezetések Magyarországon (2000 — 2008) – Digital Alpha technológia vezető adatközponti és vállalati szerver platformmá tétele (másokkal együttes csapat tagjaként) Magyarországon (1993 — 1998) – Koncepcionális modellezés (ma használatos elnevezéssel: domain-driven design) az objektum-orientált programozással kombinált módon (1985 — 1993) – Poszt-graduális képzés a miniszámítógépes szoftverfejlesztés, konkurrens (párhuzamos) programozás és más témákban (1973 — 1984) Az utóbbi időben általam művelt területek: ld. lazure2.wordpress.com (Experiencing the Cloud) – Predictive strategies based on the cyclical nature of the ICT development (also based on my previous findings during the period of 1978 — 1990) – User Experience Design for the Cloud – Marketing Communications based on the Cloud
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6 Responses to Marko Ahtisaari from Nokia and Steven Guggenheimer from Microsoft on the Internet of Things day of LeWeb Paris’12

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  6. Pingback: With Asha Touch starting at $83 and Lumia at $186 Nokia targeting the entry-level and low-end smartphone markets–UPDATED [Dec 19, 2012] new entry prices and Lumia 505 (? $220 ?) with AMOLED ClearBlack and Gorilla Glass | Experiencing the Cloud

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